Are You a Brain-Savvy Leader? 4 Advantages of being One

I’m passionate about how brain insight can enhance our leadership. I’ve lived in a neuroscience world for over 25 years battling the effects of my youngest daughter’s brain tumor (and she is doing well now). In my fourth book, Brain-Savvy Leaders: the Science of Significant Ministry I show how leaders can effectively apply brain insight to their lives and leadership.  Canada’s largest Christian TV program, 100 Huntley Street, interviewed me about the book. You can view the video here. I believe leaders who learn about how their brain works can enhance their leadership effectiveness. Here are the top 4 advantages of brain-savvy leaders.

1. Brain-savvy leaders lead teams more effectively.

One example is called emotional contagion. Our brains and behavior mirror the emotional temperature of those around us, whether it’s good or bad.

Leaders who understand how the brain works seek to bring a positive, hopeful tone to their meetings and their leadership culture which makes for happier and more effective teams. Learn how to motivate your teams here with these 4 brain-savvy insights.

2. Brain-savvy leaders understand how best to control their emotions.

Within our brain two forces vie for our energies, thinking and feeling. When negative emotions take precedent in our brains, we don’t think as clearly. When emotions rule, leadership suffers. However, brain-savvy leaders learn to monitor and control this see-saw dynamic resulting in more consistent fruit of the Spirit (Eph. 5.22-23). Learn here how pastors and leaders sometimes lead out of their lizard brains (our emotional side).

3. Brain-savvy leaders effect lasting change better.

Often our change efforts fall flat. However, by incorporating how people’s brains respond to change, leaders can create change initiatives that reflects such insight. The result? The change you hoped for can go much better. Learn 6 brain barriers to healthy church change here.

4. Brain-savvy leaders experience greater personal productivity.

One example involves multi-tasking. Although we may think we can multi-task (i.e., write an email and talk on the phone at the same time), we really can’t perform more than one task at a time that requires our attention. Our effectiveness actually drops when we attempt to multi-task. It’s called dual-task switch cost. It’s the proverbial feeling we get when we switch back and forth, the “Where was I now” effect that actually takes more time than focusing on a single task at a time. Here you can learn 7 ways multi-tasking dumbs down leadership effectiveness.

Leaders in today’s complicated world can enhance their leadership effectiveness and joy by learning how to leverage brain-savvy insight. You can learn more from my book, Brain-Savvy Leaders.

How would you rate your brain-savvyness?

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