What Would you Do for $10,000,000? How Leaders Build Integrity

What are you willing to do for $10,000,000?

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James Patterson and Peter Kim published the book, The Day America Told the Truth in 1991. In their research they posed this question to 2,000 Americans in an anonymous survey. These are the results.

  • Would abandon their entire family (25%)
  • Would abandon their church (25%)
  • Would become prostitutes for a week or more (23%)
  • Would give up their citizenships (16%)
  • Would leave their spouses (16%)
  • Would withhold testimony and let a murderer go free (10%)
  • Would kill a stranger (7%)
  • Would put their children up for adoption (3%)

These stats and others reveal that integrity is taking a beating today. Yet, leaders who truly want to honor God and effectively lead must lead with integrity.

One of the most interesting narratives in the Bible, the story about Daniel and his three friends, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, illustrate how leaders build integrity. These young Hebrew men were conscripted into service for Babylon by King Nebuchadnezzar after receiving three years of training.

As you read this qualities, rank yourself on each one.

Integrous leaders…

1. …willingly make tough choices.

Daniel refused to eat the king’s food offered to young conscripts (Daniel 1.8) because the Jewish law prohibited eating food offered in idol worship. He risked expulsion from the training academy and possibly death by making such a choice. He made the tough choice anyway.

2. …treat their critics and adversaries with respect. 

After the king’s wise men, of which Daniel was one, were unable to both tell the king a dream he had and interpret it, he issued an edict to have all the wise men executed. However, just before the execution Daniel approached the executioner with ‘tact,’ a Hebrew word used to describe taste (Daniel 2.14). The way Daniel approached the executioner literally left a good taste in the executioner’s mouth, a euphemism we use today to describe a good experience with another. This encounter opened up the door for Daniel to appeal to the king and interpret his dream which in turn prompted Nebuchadnezzar to rescend his decision.

Interesting brain insight: a part of our brain called the insult registers taste and emotional experiences with others like disgust and bitterness. Daniel’s interaction with the executioner kept the executioner’s brain from responding with these strong negative emotions, a wise example for we leaders when dealing with those who oppose us. Try to leave a good taste in the mouths of your critics.

3. … build their moral compass around Jesus.

When Daniel appeared before the king, he told him that no mere human could interpret his dream, but that the God of heaven could solve his conundrum. Daniel’s commitment to God served as his true north, his moral compass. Whenever Daniel faced a decision he always defaulted to what pleased God. This post describes how to build true north values into your life and leadership.

4. … remain consistent even in the small things of  life and leadership.

In Daniel’s later years he was faced with what appeared to be a small compromise. The then current king, King Darius, was tricked by leaders jealous of Daniel into issuing a 30-day edict requiring everyone to pray to the the king. Because they could find no character flaws in Daniel (Daniel 6.4), they resorted to trickery.

For decades Daniel had prayed to God three times a day and everyone knew it. Daniel, now in his 80’s, could have easily made this small compromise (pray to God in secret and fake prayers to the king) to avoid stress and difficulty in his old age. However, he refused to and was thrown into the lion’s den where God later rescued him. Great leaders refuse to cut corners, compromise, or hedge in even the small matters of life and leadership. 

5. …realize the people will either become bitter or better when they live with integrity.

Throughout the story, people responded to his integrity in one of two ways. They either were threatened by it and hated Daniel because of his integrity or they lauded it. When leaders take a stand for integrity, not everyone will respect your stance, cheer you on, and affirm you. Some will do the opposite. Great leaders lead well regardless of how people respond to their integrity.

6. …model integrity for their kids and grandkids.

Although Daniel and his three friends don’t model this quality, it’s worth stating. Our kids and grandkids will more likely do what we do (and did) that what we say (or said).

Centuries ago the ancient Chinese were so fearful of their enemies on the north that they built the Great Wall of China, one of the 7 wonders of the ancient world. It was so high they knew no one could climb over it & so thick that nothing could break it down. Then they settled back to enjoy their security.

 But during the first 100 years of the wall’s existence, China was invaded 3 times. Not once did the enemy break down the wall or climb over its top. Each time they bribed a gatekeeper and marched right through the gates. According to the historians, the Chinese were so busy relying upon the walls of stone that they forgot to teach integrity to their children (source unknown).

Great leaders diligently seek to live, model, and build integrity into their lives. With integrity they spiritually thrive. Without it, their souls wither.

What other characteristics would describe an integrous leader?

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Are You a Brain-Savvy Leader? 4 Advantages of being One

I’m passionate about how brain insight can enhance our leadership. I’ve lived in a neuroscience world for over 25 years battling the effects of my youngest daughter’s brain tumor. I recently received an executive masters in the neuroscience of leadership. And my fourth book, Brain-Savvy Leaders: the Science of Significant Ministry shows how leaders can effectively apply brain insight to their lives and leadership. Recently, Canada’s largest Christian TV program, 100 Huntley Street, interviewed me about my recent book. You can view the video here. I believe leaders who learn about how their brain works can enhance their leadership effectiveness. Here are the top 4 advantages of brain-savvy leaders.

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1. Brain-savvy leaders lead teams more effectively.

One example is called emotional contagion. Our brains and behavior mirror the emotional temperature of those around us, whether it’s good or bad.

Leaders who understand how the brain works seek to bring a positive, hopeful tone to their meetings and their leadership culture which makes for happier and more effective teams. Learn how to motivate your teams here with these 4 brain-savvy insights.

2. Brain-savvy leaders understand how best to control their emotions.

Within our brain two forces vie for our energies, thinking and feeling. When negative emotions take precedent in our brains, we don’t think as clearly. When emotions rule, leadership suffers. However, brain-savvy leaders learn to monitor and control this see-saw dynamic resulting in more consistent fruit of the Spirit (Eph. 5.22-23). Learn here how pastors and leaders sometimes lead out of their lizard brains (our emotional side).

3. Brain-savvy leaders effect lasting change better.

Often our change efforts fall flat. However, by incorporating how people’s brains respond to change, leaders can create change initiatives that reflects such insight. The result? The change you hoped for can go much better. Learn 6 brain barriers to healthy church change here.

4. Brain-savvy leaders experience greater personal productivity.

One example involves multi-tasking. Although we may think we can multi-task (i.e., write an email and talk on the phone at the same time), we really can’t perform more than one task at a time that requires our attention. Our effectiveness actually drops when we attempt to multi-task. It’s called dual-task switch cost. It’s the proverbial feeling we get when we switch back and forth, the “Where was I now” effect that actually takes more time than focusing on a single task at a time. Here you can learn 7 ways multi-tasking dumbs down leadership effectiveness.

Leaders in today’s complicated world can enhance their leadership effectiveness and joy by learning how to leverage brain-savvy insight. You can learn more from my book, Brain-Savvy Leaders.

How would you rate your brain-savvyness?

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Hidden Beliefs in a Leader’s Life: Clues to Discovery

Kevin Cashman wrote an outstanding book on leadership called Leadership from the Inside Out: Becoming a Leader for Life. In his book he writes about both conscious beliefs and hidden beliefs he calls shadow beliefs. He defines a shadow belief as a belief we hold deep inside, outside of our conscious awareness. Those beliefs profoundly affect us and our leadership. He provides keen insight about how to discover those beliefs.

Illustration of confident handsome young businessman standing with arms folded with superhero shadow concept

He contends that these beliefs often hinder leaders from being their best. For example, one shadow belief might be a subtle voice inside that constantly says, “You must perform better than everybody else for people to like you.” For me, one shadow belief I discovered was this. “Everybody around me needs to be happy for me to be happy. Therefore, I must try to make everybody happy.” In the past that belief often stifled my joy and peace and hindered my leadership.

Cashman says that we must bring those shadow beliefs into the light for us to lead at our best. He suggests seven clues that can bring these shadow beliefs to light.

  1. If other people often give us feedback inconsistent with how we see ourselves, a shadow belief is present.
  2. When we feel stuck or blocked and at a loss about what to do next, a shadow belief is holding us back.
  3. If strengths become counterproductive a shadow belief may be behind it.
  4. When are are not open to new information, new learning, or other people’s views, a shadow belief is limiting us.
  5. If we react to circumstances with emotional responses disproportionate to the situation, it may point to a shadow belief.
  6. When we find ourselves forcefully reacting to the limitations of others in a critical, judgemental way, we are often projecting our shadow belief upon others.
  7. If we often experience pain, trauma, or discomfort in our body, a shadow belief may be trying to rise to the surface.

As I’ve faced my shadow beliefs, I’ve experienced greater peace in my life and become a more productive leader.

How about you? What shadow beliefs might be dogging your leadership?

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5 Ways to Improve Decision Making

A leader must make lots of decisions. The better decisions we make, the better our leadership, the better our churches and ministries, and the better those around us perform. So what can we do to improve decision making? Consider these five ways.

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5 Ways to Improve Decision making

1. Avoid decision fatigue.

Decision fatigue refers to the phenomenon that occurs when the quality of our decisions degrades after a long string of successive decisions. When important decision face you, make them when you are the most refreshed, usually in the morning (although night owls may make better decisions at night). Learn more about decision fatigue here.

2. Get enough sleep.

The U.S. CDC stated in 2013 that 35% of adults aged 25-65 reported that they unintentionally fell asleep during the previous month. And the same percentage reported that they get less than 7 hours of sleep each night, although sleep experts recommend that we get 7-9 hours each night. When we don’t get adequate sleep, here’s what happens. (For a more detailed look at leaders and their sleep, read this post).

  • Our attention, alertness, and mental response speed decrease.
  • Creativity gets dampened.
  • Our brain’s CEO (the pre-frontal cortex) that is responsible for executive functions like planning, emotional control, decision making, and abstract think gets compromised.

If sometimes you just can’t get enough sleep, a short 10-20 minute nap can boost your alertness and the quality of your decisions.

3. Practice metacognition.

Metacognition is a fancy word for ‘thinking about your thinking.’ Often we get caught up in a thinking auto-pilot mode. And since our brain has five time more negative circuits than positive ones, thinking usually turns negative. It’s called the negativity bias. So, practice pausing during the day to ask yourself, “What am I thinking about right now?” This discipline can help you avoid wasted mental energy on unprofitable thoughts. The Apostle Paul counsels us to do this in Philippians 4.8.

4. Recognize how emotions affect our decisions.

For years we assumed that great decisions were based on logic alone. That is, a good leader, after mentally processing the merits of a decision, would arrive at the best one primarily through a logical thought process. However, scientists are now learning that emotion plays a much larger part in decision making than previous thought. Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio found impaired decision making in people who had brain injuries to their emotional centers. So, factoring in how you feel about a decision might help you make a better one.

5. Recognize how long-term stress diminishes good decision making.

God created our bodies with an ability to respond to danger. It’s called the stress response, largely influenced by the stress hormone, cortisol. However, long term stress actually shrinks brain cells in our memory centers. And it strengthens brains cells in our fight-flight centers which in turn dampens our brain’s CEO that guides the decision making process. So, if you’ve been stressed a long time, it might behoove you to delay any significant decisions until your stress diminishes.

What has helped you make better decisions?

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What Effective Pastors Must Prioritize

I’ve been a pastor almost 35 years and I’ve made lots of mistakes. But as I’ve grown wiser, I’ve learned that if I prioritize a few key choices, my life and leadership dramatically improve and my ministry becomes more effective. Here are three key choices I encourage every pastor to prioritize.

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Priorities for every pastor

1. Place sermon prep time at the top of your list.

Whether you preach or teach regularly, unless you calendar when you prep your messages, you will likely shortchange adequate prep time. I’ve been doing it for decades now, but I still need 15 plus hours each week to craft a message. I calendar my study time in the mornings when my mind is freshest. In this post I delve more deeply into sermon prep time. 

2. Craft messages that included three essential components.

  • Build them around a strong Biblical basis. Make sure your messages are rooted in God’s Word.
  • Always include clear application. This is where you connect the then and there to the here and now. People will remember your teaching better when they can apply to their lives what you say. It’s called self-referential learning. Stuff sticks in our brains when it’s self-referential.
  • Keep in mind techniques to help your listener pay attention. Only what gets paid attention to gets learned. And if the church people don’t pay attention to your messages, they won’t make much of a difference in their lives. In this post I suggest 5 brain-savvy ways to help people pay attention to your sermons. 

3. Keep yourself healthy.

Ministry leaders who prevail prioritize their health. And the arenas of health include your body, your relationships, your mind, your emotions, and your soul. To keep healthy in these areas requires we make these choices.

  • Eat healthy.
  • Exercise at least 3 times a week.
  • Get enough sleep.
  • Keep short relational accounts with others. Deal with conflict sooner than later.
  • Challenge and stretch your mind by learning new things, even outside your ministry role.
  • Process your emotional pain.
  • Spend time with God every day, excluding sermon prep time.

As I’ve prioritized these three areas, ministry has become much more fulfilling.

What other areas do you believe pastors should prioritize so they stay sharp and effective?

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